Livestock and Farm Fishing

Livestock and Farm Fishing

Burundi’s economy is mainly rural, and is thus essentially based on agriculture (coffee, tea, cotton) and livestock. More than 90% of the population depends it it also represents more than 50% of GDP.

The Agricultural National Strategy comes at the right time to answer the multiple functions that the agricultural sector is called to assume.
In July 2008, the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock of Republic of Burundi validated the agricultural sectorial politics under the title “Agricultural National Strategy”.

There are four strategic axes to the strategy: (i) lasting growth of productivity and the agricultural production (ii) promotion of the paths and the agribusiness (iii) support to the professionalization of the producers and development of the private initiatives and, (iv) backing of the capacities of management and development of the agricultural sector.

The agricultural sector in Burundi benefits from several assets:

  • Vast plains of the very fertile Imbo that is suitable to the modern agriculture
  • Rainfall for 9 months every year
  • Possibility of irrigation (artificial lakes)
  • Possibility to harvest twice a year for an output of more than 10 tons per ha (rice and cereals)

The main export crop is coffee; its industry is in the process of being privatized and FDI potential is considerable. These factors could have a significant impact and improve the quality and increase the productivity of the coffee sector.

 
  • Opportunities to leverage modern equine for intensive or extensive breeding
  • Animal production lines, livestock, dairy processing, production of organic manure are opportunities
  • Several regions are adequate for fish farming
Political Structure

Political Structure

Structure of Government

Burundi’s political system is a presidential representative democratic republic based on a multi–party state. There are currently 21 registered parties in Burundi. The President of Burundi is the head of state and head of government. The Burundi government is divided into three branches including the executive, legislative and judicial branch. The executive division comprises of the president and the council of ministers, the legislative branch comprises of a national assembly and a senate while the judicial section consists of the Supreme Court and the other constitutional courts.

The president holds the most important position in the government of Burundi and is also responsible for electing council ministers during election. The President serves the country for five year terms after which elections are held.

The Burundi political parties play a key role in governing the country. Burundi Democratic Front (FRODEBU), National Council for the Defense of Democracy and the Unity for National Progress (UPRONA) are the major political parties of Burundi. A multi–party system came into the Burundi government after 1998.

 

Legislative Branch

Burundi’s legislative branch is a bicameral assembly, which comprises the National Assembly and the Senate. The National Assembly includes 100 directly elected members plus additional deputies appointed as necessary to ensure an ethnic and gender composition as mandated by the constitution of Burundi (60% Hutu, 40% Tutsi, 30% female, and 3 Batwa members). Members of the National Assembly are elected by popular vote and serve for five year terms.

The Senate has fifty–one members, and three seats are reserved for former presidents. Due to stipulations in Burundi’s constitution, 30% of Senate members must be female. Members of the Senate are elected by electoral colleges, which consist of members from each of Burundi’s provinces and communes. For each of Burundi’s seventeen provinces, one Hutu and one Tutsi senator are chosen. One term for the Transitional Senate is five years.
Burundi’s legislative branch elects the President for a five–year term. Burundi’s president appoints officials to his Council of Ministers, which is also part of the executive branch. The president can also pick fourteen members of the Transitional Senate to serve on the Council of Ministers. Members of the Council of Ministers must be approved by two–thirds of Burundi’s legislature.

The president also chooses two vice–presidents. As of 2010, the President of Burundi is Pierre Nkurunziza. The First Vice President is Therence Sinunguruza, and the Second Vice President is Gervais Rufyikiri.
The Burundi multi–party system consists of 44 registered political parties, of which CNDD– FDD (the National Council for the Defense of Democracy), FNL (the National Forces for Liberation), FRODEBU (the Front for Democracy in Burundi), and UPRONA (the National Unity and Progress Party) are national, mainstream parties. Other opposition parties include MSD (Movement for Solidarity and Democracy), CNDD (Council for the Defense of Democracy), PARENA (the Party for National Redress), and FRODEBU Nyakuri (part of the mainstream FRODEBU that won important swing votes in the National Assembly in the 2010 elections).

 

Judicial Branch

The judicial branch consists of the Supreme Court and the other constitutional courts. The Supreme Court is Burundi’s highest court, below which there are three Courts of Appeals. Tribunals of First Instance are used as judicial courts in each of Burundi’s provinces as well as 123 local tribunals.

Executive Branch

The executive power lies with the President, the First Vice President in charge of political and administrative affairs and the Second Vice President in charge of social and economic affairs and the 21–member Council of Ministers.

The president holds the most important position in the government of Burundi and is also responsible for electing council ministers during election. The President is supposed to serve the country for a term of five years.

Membership to International Organizations
Burundi is a member of many international organisations and has preferential access to many international markets. Below is a list of the main organisations of which Burundi is a member :

East African Community
Burundi is one of the 5 Member States of the East African Community (EAC), one of the most integrated regional economic communities in Africa with a population of 133.5 million people, a combined GDP of 74.5 billion USD and a land area of 1.82 million sq. km. Burundi joined the EAC in 2007 along with Rwanda bringing up to five the number of EAC member countries.

 

The regional economic bloc encompasses Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda and its realization bears great strategic and geopolitical significance and prospects of a renewed and reinvigorated East African Community.

The EAC aims at widening and deepening co–operation among the member countries in, among others, political, economic and social fields for their mutual benefit. To this extent the EAC countries established a Customs Union in 2005 and launched a Common Market in 2010, and are working towards the establishment of a Monetary Union by 2012 and ultimately a Political Federation of the East African States.

The regional integration process is at a high pitch at the moment as reflected by the encouraging progress of the East African Customs Union, the signing in November 2009 and ratification in 2010 of the Common Market Protocol by all the Partner States.

The negotiations for the East African Monetary Union, which commenced in 2011, and fast tracking the process towards East African Federation all underscore the serious determination of the East African leadership and citizens to construct a powerful and sustainable East African economic and political bloc.

Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)
Burundi is one of the 19 Member States forming the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), the largest Regional Economic Community (REC) in Africa, with a population of over 430 million, and a combined GDP of over USD 447 billion. Burundi is one of the 14 COMESA Member States currently taking part in the COMESA Free Trade Area which grants it tariff–free and quota–free access to 13 other major markets in the COMESA region.

 

Having successfully launched its Customs Union in 2009, COMESA is continuing on the road of regional integration by supporting the continual creation of better investment conditions, making it an increasingly internationally competitive economic community.

The importance of Burundi’s membership of COMESA and its FTA lies in COMESA’s higher FDI growth rate (an increase14.6% in 2010 compared to a decrease of 9% in Africa for the same period) as well as its high average GDP growth rate (5.7% in 2009).

COMESA Member States include: Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe.

Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS)
Burundi is one of the 11 Member States forming the Economic Community of Central and Eastern Africa States (ECCAS), the Regional Economic Community (REC) in Africa encompassing most central African countries. A part from Burundi other ECCAS Member States include Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, DRC, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sao Tome et Principe.


Economic Community of the Great Lakes Countries (ECGLC)

Burundi is one of the 3 members of the Economic Community of the Great Lakes Countries (ECGLC). ECGLC membership includes Burundi, DRC and Rwanda. ECGLC is a sub–regional organization with multiple vocation created by the signing of the Agreement of Gisenyi in Rwanda on September 20, 1976, aiming at insuring the safety of member states, at favoring the creation and the development of activities of public interest, at promoting the trades and the traffic of the persons and the possessions, at establishing the cooperation in a narrow way in all the domains of the political, economic and social life.

Vision Burundi 2025

Vision Burundi 2025 is a long–term plan devised by the Government of Burundi to constantly improve living conditions in the country and make Burundi a safe, clean and healthy place to live and work in. Burundi 2025 is a tool for long–term development planning, which will guide policies and strategies for sustainable development, in order to meet the needs of the present without hampering or compromising the chances of future generations.

It is also an expression of determination to build a new, democratic, reconciled, unified Burundi, a land of opportunities for all. In order to achieve this, the Vision Burundi 2025 identifies eight interrelated pillars :

  • Good Governance and Capacity Building of the State
  • Human capital
  • Economic growth and the fight against poverty
  • Regional integration
  • Demographics
  • Social cohesion
  • Land use and urbanization
  • Partnership

The development of the Vision “Burundi 2025” takes place in a context of important political change marked by the restoration of peace and security and a favourable economic outlook. Vision “Burundi 2025” aims to provide Burundi with an efficient instrument of development policies planning with a view to develop policies and strategies for sustainable development which will bring forward changes within one generation. This vision was developed based on a participatory approach and reflected a national consensus.

 

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Capital transfer

Capital transfer

Capital transfer advantages include:

Free transfer of foreign capital and income after payment of taxes.Transferring unused professional income by foreign employees.

The transfer of capital remuneration in the form of dividends, in full for enterprises with foreign capital.

  • Protection of private property.
  • Non–nationalization and non–expropriation of investments implemented in its territory as well as any measures of equivalent scope.

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Burundian Imports

Burundian Imports

Imports play a major role in the Burundi economy. The terms of trade for the country register large trade deficits as the countries imports more than it exports. Imports comprise a wide variety of goods, mainly composed of manufactured goods, equipment, food, petroleum products and fuel. Manufactures make up about two–thirds of Burundi merchandise imports; fuels account for about 15%. This reflects the need to invest in domestic manufacturing and the scarcity of fuel resources in the country.

EU countries, in particular Belgium, China and India are the major sources of Burundi’s imports. Of particular attention is the increasing share of imports from African countries, from 12% during 1969–1980 to 34% during 2000–2004. Tanzania, Kenya, and Zambia have been the leading suppliers. This development reflects Burundi’s efforts in regional integration, most notably its membership in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), comprising Kenya and Zambia, and the East African Community (whose membership includes Tanzania).

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Manufacturing

Manufacturing

While the industrial sector could definitely become more competitive and diversified, the government is still very present. The export potential for this sector mainly lies in sub–regional markets and opportunities exist, among others, in the agro–industrial sector.

Some non–exhaustive examples to explore :

 

  • Production, packaging, marketing of agricultural equipment and inputs
  • Production of fruits and vegetables
  • Packaging and transport
  • Research and development on the conservation of agricultural foodstuffs
  • Agri-food transformation industry (rice, cereals, etc.)
  • Fertilizer plants (phosphates in the north of the country)
  • Cement plants (raw materials available in the northeast)
  • Textile industry
  • Tea Factories in the South of the country (there are 4500 ha of land adequate for the cultivation of tea)

 

Investment Opportunities

  • Food processing industry for domestic production (rice, cereals, tomatoes, milk, vegetables, etc.)
  • Untapped opportunities in the construction sector including glass windows and doors, metal bars, tiles, cement production, etc
  • Production of chemicals including fertilizers for breeding and farming
  • Textile and shoe-making industries
  • Pharmaceutical industry as very few medicines are produced locally
  • Almost all manufactured consumer goods are imported offering plenty of opportunities in almost all industries

Invest Burundi

Foreign Trade

Foreign Trade

Burundian Exports

The country exports mostly coffee, tea and manufactures. These three products alone account for 97% of Burundian exports.

Burundi’ export performance depends heavily on the price and production of coffee, its major Export (72.1%, 2005, Economist Intelligence Unit). Its other exports include tea, sugar, cotton (historically, but there were no formal exports of cotton during the 1997–2004 period; cotton exports resumed in 2005) and hides.

Total exports averaged about $50 million a year during 2000–2004, with coffee accounting for a little less than half the total. Tea accounted for about 5 percent; nonmonetary gold, always showing wide swings from year to year, accounted for about one–fifth of the total. Burundi has over the years sought to promote exports of non-traditional items such as cut flowers and exotic plants, vegetables and tropical fruit, and more recently essential oils.

MAIN EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (2005)

Main exports 2005% of totalMain imports 2005% of total
Coffee72.1Capital goods18.6
Tea15.7Intermediate goods50.9
Manufactures9.3Consumption goods29.8
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit: May 2011
A good share of Burundi’s exports goes to the European Union (EU); the EU was the destination of about 58% of Burundi’s exports during 2000–2004. Within Europe, the biggest markets are represented by Germany, Belgium, and Switzerland.
A noticeable shift is the larger share of exports to African countries: their share has risen to over 15% in 2000–2004, up from only 2% in 1960–1980, 10% in 1982–1992 and 11% in 1993–1999. The increase in African countries’ share reflects the impact of regional integration efforts; It is worth mentioning that African countries may not be the final destination of such exports as coffee and tea.

Burundian Imports

Imports play a major role in the Burundi economy. The terms of trade for the country register large trade deficits as the countries imports more than it exports. Imports comprise a wide variety of goods, mainly composed of manufactured goods, equipment, food, petroleum products and fuel. Manufactures make up about two–thirds of Burundi merchandise imports; fuels account for about 15%. This reflects the need to invest in domestic manufacturing and the scarcity of fuel resources in the country.

EU countries, in particular Belgium, China and India are the major sources of Burundi’s imports. Of particular attention is the increasing share of imports from African countries, from 12% during 1969–1980 to 34% during 2000–2004. Tanzania, Kenya, and Zambia have been the leading suppliers. This development reflects Burundi’s efforts in regional integration, most notably its membership in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), comprising Kenya and Zambia, and the East African Community (whose membership includes Tanzania).

Applicable Sectors For Investment Opportunties

Applicable Sectors For Investment Opportunties

One of the first questions I get asked are what are the possible investment opportunities and in what sectors are ripe for trade? So we compiled a list of investment opportunities in Burundi:

Real Estate

The country has a number of top class hotels in Bujumbura, on the edge of Lake Tanganyika and Kiriri Hillthat overlooks the capital city. Although new hotels are being built in the country, hotel capacity is still very low and hotel sector remains under exploited, representing an opportunity for investors.

 

Services

The impact of economic reforms is particularly palpable in the services sector in Burundi where the potential for increasing investment is great. Of all sectors, investment in the ICT sector is booming as this has proven to be the most open sector to FDI in recent years, particularly mobile telephony. Investment opportunities in services are increasingly facilitated by the entry of Burundi into the Eastern African Community (EAC), which (i) increases the market size, (ii) stimulates service diversification, and (iii) allows the country to establish itself as a sub–regional corridor. Indeed, strategically located at the interstices of Central, Eastern and Southern Africa, Burundi could become a centre for transit trade in the sub–region.

In this context, the role of the IPA is important to promote this image of key transit centre to the investors’ community and to attract FDI in general services and facilities, such as construction, mechanics, repair activities, catering, distribution and hotel industry, which can meet the needs of economic actors in transit. In the longer term, the IPA could expand its activities to include legal services, management consulting to private firms and other ICT services.

 

Mining

The mining sector is a priority sector for the Burundi Government. Mining could considerably contribute to job creation, thus reducing pressure on agricultural employment, as well as to the diversification of the economy, have the effects of technology transfer and last but not least result in an increase of state revenue. Burundi’s mineral resources are varied but fairly modest, the main one being nickel. Mining is so far mainly traditional but industrial exploration licenses have been granted to foreign investors since 2007.

It is recommended that the Government clarify certain elements relating to mining and negotiations and align the new Mining Code with the investment environment and business codes currently under review. The government is currently preparing a new Mining Code.

With regards to the mining sector

  • The country is full of many natural resources: nickel, cassiterite, colombo tantalite, gold, phosphates, limestone, slate, and hydrocarbons
  • Exploitation is still hand–crafted, therefore an opportunity for potential investors
  • Some mining conventions exist for research of nickel and gold
  • The mining market remains open
  • A study on the development of the mining sector is on–going

 

Manufacturing

While the industrial sector could definitely become more competitive and diversified, the government is still very present. The export potential for this sector mainly lies in sub–regional markets and opportunities exist, among others, in the agro–industrial sector.

Some non–exhaustive examples to explore :

  • Production, packaging, marketing of agricultural equipment and inputs
  • Production of fruits and vegetables
  • Packaging and transport
  • Research and development on the conservation of agricultural foodstuffs
  • Agri-food transformation industry (rice, cereals, etc.)
  • Fertilizer plants (phosphates in the north of the country)
  • Cement plants (raw materials available in the northeast)
  • Textile industry
  • Tea Factories in the South of the country (there are 4500 ha of land adequate for the cultivation of tea)
FDI in Burundi

FDI in Burundi

In terms of international investment, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Burundi rose from an average 0,5 million USD in 1999 to 10 million USD in 2009 (UNCTAD, 2010), a twenty–fold increase in 10 years. This is due in large part to the stabilization of the political situation and the actions taken by the government in recent years to attract FDI.

Foreign Investment

The Government of Burundi’s official attitude toward foreign direct investment is reflected in the new Investment Code, which was formally enacted in September 2008. The investment code aims to attract and reassure foreign investors by encouraging and facilitating acquisitions, production, transformation and distribution of goods and services. The investment code outlines the government desire to stimulate foreign investment but highlights a continuing lack of transparent, specific regulations to foster significant foreign investment.

Foreign investors in Burundi can count on sound business–conducive policy environment which guarantees equal and fair treatment of all foreign and local enterprises. Not only Burundi has no overall economic or industrial strategies that discriminate against foreign investors, but it has no general limits on foreign ownership or control of enterprises nor are there established processes or criteria for the review of foreign investments. The 2008 Investment Code provides a streamlined and fair process for all investors, whether locally or foreign–based.

Burundi Judicial System

Furthermore Burundi’s judicial system upholds the sanctity of contracts. In case of a dispute involving foreign interests, a Centre for Arbitration and Mediation has been established by the government to handle such issues. Additionally the plaintiff has the option of referring its complaint to either the national courts or an international arbiter.

There is no explicit discrimination against foreign investors at any stage of the investment process, nor are there any laws or regulations specifically authorizing private firms to adopt articles of incorporation or association which limit or prohibit foreign investment, participation, or control.

There are no restrictions on business sectors open to foreign investments, with the exception of arms and military enterprises, investments in this sector are conducted on a government–to–government basis.

Privatization

The government is in the process of privatizing Burundi’s coffee industry –– the largest source of foreign exports – and with many foreign companies purchasing Burundian coffee, the interest in investing in this industry is high.

Major investment projects in Burundi have originated in Kenya, Switzerland, India, Uganda and the United States mostly in the financial services sector. Some of the recent investments into Burundi include :

  • Jubilee Holding (Kenya) – financial services
  • Commercial Bank of Africa (Kenya) – financial services
  • Kenya Commercial Bank (Kenya) – financial services
  • Diamond Trust Bank (Kenya, Switzerland) – financial services
  • Aga Khan Development Network (Switzerland) – financial services
  • United Bank of Africa (Nigeria) – financial services
  • Global Trust Bank (Uganda) – financial services
  • Healthcare Global Enterprise (India) – health services
Cost of Doing Business in Burundi

Cost of Doing Business in Burundi

Fuels

The Eastern African region is said to be particularly rich in fuel and gas reserves, with at least 28 prospective sedimentary basins out of which Burundi has two, which have not been exploited yet.

Most energy consumed in Burundi comes from wood and charcoal (about 95%). Other forms of energy include petroleum products, hydropower and peat. The country’s electrification rate is very low (1.8%) and more than 90% of electricity is consumed in Bujumbura.

The hydropower potential is 1,700 megawatts (MW) of power theory, of which 300 MW is considered economically exploitable. At present, only 32 MW are operated. In addition, Burundi imports about 40% of its energy consumption, mainly from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

 

Telecommunications and providers (mobile and fixed; local and international)

The biggest investments that Burundi has known since the beginning of the crisis were in the telecommunications sector, characterized by high flow of FDI in 2000, valued at 11.7 million USD. This peak was due to the liberalization of mobile telephony put forward by the government in the 2000s.Two licenses were indeed granted to foreign companies, Africell and Spacetel (Econet), whose respective international partners are Alcatel in France and Ericsson in Sweden.

The same year, the U.S. USAN Burundi has established itself as an internet service provider. In 2008, the Egyptian company Orascom bought U–Com, owned by the Indian group Global Vision. In addition, two additional licenses were awarded, one to HITS Telecom a joint venture Uganda–Saudi Arabia, and the other to a Nepalese company called Lacelle SU (Smart Mobile).

Regarding telecommunications, the country has four fixed telephone lines per 1,000 inhabitants mostly in urban areas. While 90% of the population lives in rural areas and 90% of subscribers are located in urban areas, network coverage in the country is very low. There are six operators, the largest of which is U–Com (formerly known as Télécel), a company that was recently privatized.

Other operators include the public operator ONATEL, which offers fixed and mobile telephony services, followed by foreign private operators Africell, Econet, Lacelle SU and HITS Telecom. The current telephone density is 2.5 lines per 100 inhabitants (fixed and mobile combined) (UNDP and Vice–Ministry of Planning, 2008).

Regarding the Internet, estimates point to 14,000 users in Burundi, five users per 1,000 inhabitants. Internet service providers include CBINET, USAN Burundi, ONATEL and U–Com.

 

Water and Sewage Rates

Currently various sources of water (including the Tanganyika Lake) provide water to 71% of the population of Burundi. The Ministry of Water, Energy and Mining is responsible for the water sector. The Tanganyika Lake has great potential not just for transport and fishing but also for tourism and water sectors as well.

The role of donors is also essential. To this end, the multi–sectoral water and electricity infrastructure project launched in 2008 and funded by the World Bank for 50 million USD is an encouraging initiative. This project aims to increase access to drinking water service in Bujumbura and strengthen the operational capacities of key sector institutions including the Ministry of Water, Energy and Mining. This program will be a great way to encourage initiatives such as :

  • The creation of a technical team that is able to define a reform strategy
  • A policy and investment strategy to improve the generation, distribution and marketing of electricity and water, and
  • Coordination of the various technical assistance initiatives

In addition, it is recommended that Burundi maximizes the benefit to be derived from existing investment programmes, including those from African or regional initiatives such as NEPAD and the African Development Bank (ADB). These organizations have indeed made water access and investment in infrastructure a real priority and can contribute to the development of Burundi. Most importantly, Burundi must take advantage of its entry in the EAC by participating in regional infrastructure development projects.

 

Domestic and Industrial Electricity Rates

The country’s electrification rate is very low (1.8%) and more than 90% of electricity is consumed in Bujumbura. The hydropower potential is 1,700 megawatts (MW) of power theory, of which 300 MW is considered economically exploitable. At present, only 32 MW are operated. In addition, Burundi imports about 40% of its energy consumption, mainly from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Tourism Opportunities

Tourism Opportunities

Located at the heart of Africa, Burundi is endowed with hills, white sandy beaches, different landscapes, and cultures.

The hospitality and kindness of Burundian people are legendary, and the country has much to offer. 17 Provinces offer visitors different experiences: Lake Tanganyika, the deepest in Africa, an incredible and wonderful variety of flowers, a rocky landscape, waterfalls, the Rusizi delta, a calm oasis, and fertile valleys. For animal lovers, the northwest primary forest is a paradise for primates and the Northern Lakes are a safe haven for birds.

Burundi has a cultural legacy that includes not only dances and traditional music but also the famous Gitega Drummers known worldwide.

Geographical position of Burundi is in the centre of the large regional communities (ECAC, CEPGL, COMESA, and EAC). Burundi, therefore could become the focal point for business and tourism with the beauty of its hills and the hospitality and kindness of its people. Its position allows easy access in less than 2 hours of flight to Africa’s most attractive tourist sites (ex: Serengeti and beaches in Zanzibar).

Burundi has an untapped tourism potential that the government wishes to develop and that is also at the center of the development strategy of the country. Experience in other post-conflict countries shows that the development of tourism, including through FDI, can help redress the country’s economic situation and therefore support the establishment of lasting peace. Putting forward its comparative advantages, Burundi should try to integrate into the East Africa region. In this area, it will nevertheless be important to separate the roles of the IPA and the National Tourism Office.

 

Different tourist attraction sites include

  • Wide sandy and sunny beaches
  • Water sports locations along Lake Tanganyika
  • The Nile source Rutovu
  • The Thermal waters of Muhweza
  • The Beaches of Nyakazu
  • Natural reserves of the Rusizi River
  • Lakes in the north of the country (bird lakes)
  • Stone Stanley and Livingstone
  • Karera Falls

Examples of opportunities 

  • Installation and development of the relaxing activities such as the thalassotherapy
  • Development of water sports
  • Introduction of ecotourism

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